Bridge at The Trout cancelled

I am very sorry, but I have to cancel the supervised play session at The Trout this Tuesday (May 7th) because of a family funeral in Holland. There will be another session in Islip on Friday and normal service will resume at the Trout on May 14th (start 9.45am). Apologies to anyone who was looking forward to the session on Tuesday. Thanks also to those who have already expressed interest in supervised play in Charlbury. We will be doing a trial first run there shortly – watch this space!

Bridge sessions coming up

Tuesday morning sessions at The Trout will continue throughout May and June, starting at 9.45am and finishing at 12.45pm. There will be no bridge in Islip tomorrow (May 3rd) but there will be another supervised play session there on Friday May 10th. More dates for single topic seminars will be published shortly – subjects include the Jacoby 2 No Trump convention and a series on two-suited bids (Michaels, Landy and the Unusual Trump). I am also looking at a number of different locations around the county for regular supervised play sessions. If you live within reach of Charlbury, in particular, please let me know if you would be interested in a regular supervised play session there, probably on Wednesdays. I am also keen to hear from anyone willing to join a four-session beginners course, to make up the numbers with an existing group.

Summer 2019 course schedule

I have now published details on the website of the confirmed Andrew Robson courses which will be starting after Easter. They are Next Step, Essential Extra, Improver Plus and Advanced courses. For more details of these courses please follow this link. To book a place simply send me an email (arb.oxford@gmail.com) and I will confirm and provide bank details by return if you need them. I am also planning to offer another Beginners course, with the first lesson free if you attend and later decide that this is not suitable for you. If the times and dates do not suit you, don’t worry – simply email me with the course that you are hoping to do and I will make arrangements to schedule it as soon as there is sufficient demand. Detailed lesson by lesson outlines of the 11 Andrew Robson courses that are available to take are now listed here. I will also separately be running single topic seminars over the course of the next few weeks – do look out for details of those. The weekly play and learn sessions will also continue after Easter.  Looking forward to seeing as many of you as possible!

One-off holiday lessons

Over the course of the next month, in addition to the weekly Tuesday morning sessions at The Trout, I am offering three single-session seminars on specific topics in which I know many of you have shown an interest. These lessons will all run to two hours and cost £20 each. They will take place on Thursday mornings beginning at 9.30 in the Library at the North Oxford Association in Summertown (plenty of parking available).

March 28th       Transfers over 1NT and 2NT (and Stayman review)

April 4th           Cue bidding and Roman Key Card Blackwood

April 18th          Signalling and an introduction to better defence

These lessons should be suitable for anyone who is familiar with basic bidding methods, either from a Robson course or from other sources.  Email me (bridge@arb-oxf.uk or arb.oxford@gmail.com) to book a place. Payment by bank transfer is preferred. For those who don’t already have them, our bank details will be provided by return if you request a place – first come, first served. I will however run a waiting list if there is an awkward number looking to attend, but I hope to be able to accommodate everyone who wants to come along.

The next set of eight-week courses will start immediately after Easter. They will run on Monday and Thursday mornings and possibly Tuesday afternoons as well. I will produce a schedule shortly. There are 11 Andrew Robson course in total (follow this link for a summary). There will definitely be an Improver/Improver Plus course on Thursday mornings, and probably a Beginners and Essential course as well.

Play sessions continue

This is to confirm that we will be continuing to run our two regular morning sessions throughout March, one on Tuesday mornings at The Trout and the second on Friday mornings at the Terrace Room in Islip Village Hall. The Trout sessions have now been running for more than two months and are proving popular, with everyone entering into the spirit of an open-minded review of each hand played.
Last Friday’s inaugural event at Islip was also well attended and the feedback on both the venue and the play session itself has been positive, so do please come and try one of these events if you can. They are a great opportunity to play real life hands and discuss them afterwards, both at the table and under supervision from Annabel and myself. Each session runs from 10am to 1pm.
If you are interested in coming it would be helpful if you could update your likely dates on the Doodle polls for each event. I don’t take these as a binding commitment on your behalf, but they are a useful indicator of core numbers. We can also normally accept you if you simply turn up on the day, with or without a partner. So don’t assume that just because the numbers on the poll look lop-sided you won’t get a chance to play – there have been more people coming than expected every week so far.
The links to the Doodle poll are as follows:
The Trout
Islip Village Hall
Each session consists of a series of real life pre-dealt hands, selected by me to bring out important points of interest. Here is one hand from Tuesday’s session which showed how bidding a slam does not depend solely on the number of High Card Points you and your partner have between you. The shape of your hand is just as important. Do you have the methods to bid Six Spades if these were your two hands? We discussed exactly how that might happen at various tables.
6S hand from The Trout March 2019
Details of the next series of bridge courses will be posted to the website any day now. My expectation is that the next round of courses will start after the school holidays, but with some one-off seminars on specific conventions and play topics between now and then. So please watch this space……..

A new play venue

As promised we are ready to try some additional times and venues for our play and learn sessions. The popular morning sessions at The Trout will continue, starting at 10am every Tuesday.  On the morning of Friday March 8th we will be holding our first trial morning session in the Terrace Room at Islip Village Hall, starting at 10am. This is one of the best venues that I have come across, spacious, comfortable and well-appointed, and ideally suited to playing bridge. It is just a couple of minutes drive from the A34 north of Oxford, and also accessible from the ring road. There is plenty of free parking. Postcode OX5 2TH.

We are offering a three hour play session with supervision available from myself and Annabel on a series of pre-dealt hands (hand records available at the end). As the Tuesday morning sessions have shown, these play and learn sessions combine an element of real life competition with the chance to meet new people and practise what you know or have learnt so far in a friendly atmosphere.

As with the Tuesday sessions, the simplest way to book a place is to make a bank transfer quoting Islip March 8th as a reference. Alternatively send us an email (bridge@arb-oxf.uk, or arb.oxford@gmail.com) declaring your intention to play and we will provide the bank details by return. All sessions cost £15 and refreshments will be available. While it is possible to turn up unannounced, we will try – but cannot absolutely guarantee – to find you a table.

We now have two new Doodle polls running for you to indicate which dates in March you might be able to make, one for The Trout on Tuesday mornings and the second for Islip on a Friday morning. These polls don’t commit you to play, of course, but are helpful for planning purposes. Once the current crop of teaching courses has ended, we may be able to work in opportunities to play on other days of the week as well, including our first duplicate sessions.

These are the links:

The Trout in March

https://doodle.com/poll/wa6msa8sqkkvhiv4

Islip on March 8th and other dates

https://doodle.com/poll/sa7ytsd5p22n5r32

 

 

 

 

Bridge tales: a rare penalty double

All the hands we have played at the play and learn sessions at The Trout are pre-dealt and therefore randomly generated by computer. That makes it all the more surprising that this week we had two hands which both provided an opportunity for the defence to double a one-level contract for penalties and then defeat it. This is a rare event in bridge.

This was the first hand (reproduced using the excellent Bridge Solver software).

Trout hand 1 !2th Feb 2019

The dealer was East and the normal opening bid here is 1 Diamond (1D), preparing to rebid 1NT/2NT over any positive response from partner, showing a balanced hand of 15-16 High Card Points. This opening bid naturally was a bit of a shock to South, with his seven diamonds headed by a strong sequence. The golden rule to apply when an opponent bids your best suit is simply to suppress your surprise and pass in good tempo, as if nothing unusual was going on.

West also passed and now the onus switches to North.  The North hand just qualifies for a takeout double, which ideally shows support for the other three suits and a shortage in the opening bidder’s suit. (In some cases it may also be the only way to kick off the bidding with a strong hand that has no other obvious bid). In either event it is not a penalty double. As a general rule any low level double when your partner has not made a positive bid (that is, something other than a pass) should be treated as a takeout rather than a penalty double.

But while North expects his partner to respond to the takeout double by bidding a suit, there will be some occasions when he/she is more than happy to convert the double into a penalty double. The way to do that is simply to pass. That should only happen, as in this case, when the partner of the doubler has a particularly long and strong holding in the doubled suit and can be confident of making most of the tricks in trumps.

Beginners in bridge often find this kind of thinking counter-intuitive; “this is our suit” they tend to say “so why aren’t we trying to play the hand instead of the opponents?” The answer to that is that the objective of the game is to score more points than the opponents. It is not just to bid and make contracts. Doubling and defeating an unmakeable contract is often the simplest and most lucrative way to make a good score.

So on this hand East will be lucky to come to more than 2 or 3 tricks if left to play in 1D doubled. If that is what happens the penalty accusing to North/South will be +800 (four down doubled, not vulnerable) or even +1100 (five down doubled, not vulnerable). At the same time the only game contract that North/South can hope to make is 5D – 11 tricks in the opponents’ suit! – which would be worth +400 points. That is only half the reward for roughly twice the effort – an unattractive bargain. The moral is: if there is a big penalty on offer, take it!

Here is the second hand on the same theme that came up shortly afterwards.

Trout hand 2 12th Feb 2019

The bidding here, with both sides vulnerable, started with West as dealer. With 5-5 in the major suits, the correct opening bid is 1S, planning to rebid in hearts. North has a perfect takeout double with 16 High Card Points and a void in spades. When this comes round to South, the calculation has to be that defeating 1S is more likely than making game, so a pass is called for. True, North South may well have a fit in diamonds, but game in diamonds is unlikely and the penalty from defeating 1S is likely to be greater than the value of the game, even if it can be made.

Note however that in order to be sure of defeating a One-level contract like this the trumps you hold will need to be at least as good as the six cards headed by a strong sequence shown here. If you only something like KJ953 in the suit that has been doubled, experience shows that the declarer will do much better than you think. One reason is that the A and Q will usually be in declarer’s hand, “sitting over” your King and Jack, thereby reducing the chances of those cards making tricks.

On this hand, with perfect knowledge of where all the opposing cards are located, North South can defeat 1S by three tricks to score +800 (three down, doubled, vulnerable). In practice two down double (+500) is probably a more likely score. Note that there is no game contract that can be made by North South on best defence, although on the day at The Trout North was allowed to make 3 No Trumps at one table.

Points to remember:

  1. If no suit has been agreed with your partner, low level doubles are usually for takeout, suggesting playing in anything but the opponent’s bid suit
  2. As the partner of the doubler however, do consider passing and turning the double in to a penalty double when you have a very long and strong holding in that suit
  3. Racking up a large penalty score by doubling and defeating a contract bid by the opponents is definitely winning bridge, especially when they are vulnerable.

It is worth noting however that on the second hand, East West will have a much better chance of escaping trouble if they can find their way to play in hearts rather than spades – they can actually make eight tricks with hearts as trumps. How to rescue yourself from a One-level doubled contract will be the subject of a different, later note.

 

 

« Older Entries Recent Entries »